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A world filled with violence. A world filled with brutal deaths. A world that often comes with fateful encounters; some favourable, some not. A world overrun with monsters of many shapes and sizes, a world reigned by powerful ones. A cruel world, an unfair world… a world that is Gunz.

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And a world filled with simpletons, apparently.

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Introduction:

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(Feel free to jump to the next section if you don’t like lengthy introductions.)

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Everyday, all the time, we meet all kinds of people; some who’re nice and pleasurable to be with and some who enjoys making people frustrated. All kinds of people, and all kinds of experience.
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Gunz is no different. Nor is other online gaming community.
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However, the Gunz community seems to have this particular culture… whether you win or you lose, hack or play legibly, skilful or just starting out… you get called a noob. If you’re doing well in a room, they try to kick you out of the room. If they lose against you more than once, they call you a hacker if you don’t get kicked.
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Life is fun. And I don’t mean that sarcastically.
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Why? Because this, on its own, is a source of entertainment. If they accuse you of being a hacker when you’re not, it shows they’re dissatisfied with the outcome of the battle and, instead of blaming their (inadequate) skills, they blame you instead. If you act indifferent towards them and/or ignore them, they get frustrated.
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And, if you can counter all of their claims effortlessly, you rile them up.
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It’s truly fun.
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Of course, don’t get me wrong; never in my life I’ve called someone a noob… a more specialised / focused degrading term maybe, but never a noob. I’ve always found ‘noob’ an overrated insult. I mean, after being called that for hundreds of times for various (usually irrelevant) issues, wouldn’t you feel it’s a useless insult as well?
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But back to the being-called-a-hacker story.
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I’ve never hacked in my whole life, in all of my gaming experiences. I’ve always played them the legit way (though I may have played on illegal private servers…), and I usually follow the rules. Even the player-made rules, such as bow rules and one-versus-one in Gunz.
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One way you could describe the way I play in Gunz as ‘fighting with honour’. Of course, honour is useless when it’s just a game, but I pretty much enjoy it. Killing an person who is AFK (away from keyboard, for those who don’t know) is boring; if I were to gain EXP, I might as well duel the usual way to gain some skill-increasing experience.
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I don’t really mind it if someone calls me a noob, though I might personally go after that person and kill him (if it’s a free-for-all room).
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I guess you could say; I’m usually nice, until someone decides to be not.
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It then becomes entertainment to me, to see someone who accuses me blindly receives an equal blow on himself.
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Tired of this lengthy intro? Let’s move on to what happened to me recently.

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Where the Wry Remark Comes In and the Simpleton is Pwned:

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I don’t really have much an issue with simpletons. Many of them irritate people by asking questions already covered in the FAQ, or in many other resources; I don’t really know if they’re lazy, or it never occurs to them.
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But the line stops when they accuse me of being a hacker when I’m not. From then on, it’s entertainment time.

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The Situation:

  • A free-for-all melee-only room in Veteran Channel. It may be called a ‘veteran’ channel, but loads of people there still play like newbies.
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  • Usually I use a single sword (as with a majority of the Gunz community), but when I’m bored, I sometimes switch to kodachi, a pair of swords that are much faster but does less damage. Pictures are shown below as proof.
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  • Kodachis are fast, but I can use them faster by hitting the guard button the moment I start the second slash (similar to how the butterfly technique is applied), thus cutting my animation sword yet still dealing two hits instead of one.

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Level 10 kodachi vs level 10 sword.

The Story:

(Note that I’ve changed That Other Guy’s real in-game name; wouldn’t like to target this blog to him. And I edited his sentences; wouldn’t do to suddenly have uncapitalised-first-letter, unpunctuated and misspelled sentences in this this blog entry, now would it?)
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  • *Me has defeated That Other Guy.*
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  • That Other Guy: Zomg hacker!!
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  • Me: Oh, so I’m a hacker now? Pray, tell me what kind of hacks I’m using.
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  • That Other Guy: That’s easy; speed hacks!
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  • Me: With a kodachi?
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  • That Other Guy: I didn’t say you did it with kodachi.
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  • Me: Oh, really; in a melee room where we can only use ONE melee weapon and a kodachi happens to be mine?
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  • That Other Guy: You still speed hacked!
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  • Me: With a kodachi? A weapon used because of its lesser delay?
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  • That Other Guy: You’re hitting me with more slashes than me!
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  • Me: Obviously; I’m hitting two slashes to your one.
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  • *momentary silence.*
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  • *Me has defeated That Other Guy.*
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  • That Other Guy: I’ve got it now, you’re using damage hacks!
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  • Me: With a kodachi? A weapon famous for its lack of damage?
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  • That Other Guy: You’re hitting me with the same damage as a sword!
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  • Me: Of course it has the same damage as a sword… that is, if you’re talking about the Rusty Sword. Besides, how would you know exactly how much damage I’m dealing to you?
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  • *long silence*
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  • *That Other Guy has left the room.*
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  • *That Other Guy has joined the room.*
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  • Me: *encounters That Other Guy in battle again.*
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  • That Other Guy: *is using a kodachi*
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  • *Me has defeated That Other Guy.*
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  • That Other Guy: Why can’t I go that fast?
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  • *That Other Guy has left the room.*

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I’ve won the moment he rejoined with a kodachi instead of a sword.
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Now, you may wonder if my claims that a kodachi has the same damage as the no-level-requirement rusty sword is right. Hence, I’ve taken the following screenshot:

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Level 10 kodachi vs level 1 sword.

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But hey, I was close, aren’t I? One point of damage isn’t really going to catch your attention like a bright, multi-coloured billboard.
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Still, it was entertaining. Let’s hope he got exceedingly frustrated from the so-called discussion enough to learn that he shouldn’t blindly accuse someone of being a hacker after that.

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~Estrelita Farr, perhaps a demon?

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No matter how many “awareness campaigns” are going on around the world, there will always be greedy people falling victim to this email hoax and forwarding it, continually circulating this hoax and making more people fall for it. It’s a continual cycle, an infinite loop.
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But what is there to do? The world is full of simpletons… or noobs, as we would say in gaming terms.
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Today, once again, I’ve received a forwarded email from one of my contacts… the exact same email hoax I’m presenting to you today.
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Do you know how long this particular email has been circulating? Since 1997! It does make you wonder just how many simpletons our world has, huh?
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In case you still think it’s real, ponder on these points:
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  • There is no way an email can be tracked so easily without raising privacy issues; if you really want to track an email, some kind of hidden script has to be embedded into it. Would you like your email to be made known to the world through that nifty little script? No? Well, that’s why Microsoft can’t track email like this… it would cause a wave of complaints throughout the world.
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  • They can’t track the email using the headers either. You know when you receive a forwarded email, you get that long list of “From: so-and-so” and “To: so-and-so” thing? It tells you where the email has been circulated thus far… providing the previous senders didn’t delete it. What happens if you were to delete that list and forward it to your list of friends? Would they know where the email have been around before it came to you? Of course not. Same goes for Bill Gates and Microsoft, they can’t track emails in this manner.
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  • Okay, so let’s assume for a moment that a forwarded email can be tracked. If a million Hotmail users were to forward the email and ONE person who forwards to so many people receives around $500 USD, wouldn’t that mean that Bill Gates would have to fork out $500 million USD? $500 million USD is already half a billion; if their net income is $4 billion USD a quarter, do you think Bill Gates will give a quarter of his company’s income freely to people who barely spent a minute forwarding emails? Would you want to do that if you were him?

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Still don’t believe it’s a hoax? Read the articles in these links:

  • Hoax Slayer: Money from Microsoft Giveaway Hoax (link)
  • Urban Legends: Bill Gates Is Sharing His Fortune! (link)
  • Snopes: Microsoft / AOL Giveaway (link)
  • Trend Micro: Make $$ “Bill Gates Fortune” Hoax (link)

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You can also ask Uncle Google about this by typing “Bill Gates sharing fortune email” and seeing what you’ll get. The same thing what I’m telling you about, right?

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But hey, what does Microsoft have to say about this? Here’s an official statement from Microsoft:

REDMOND, Wash., May 12, 1999 – Recently an email has been circulating on the Internet about a new "email tracking system" from Microsoft.
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As you may have suspected, this is a hoax and did not originate from Microsoft.
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Microsoft does try to investigate the source of these hoaxes and take appropriate action. However, many times the hoaxers take elaborate steps to shield their true identities and we cannot identify them. Privacy and security are very important to us here at Microsoft, and we work every day to build great software for the Internet that keeps information safe, secure and private.
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We regret any inconvenience this may have caused you.

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You can search for the official statement by typing “Bill Gates sharing fortune email official statement” in Google search.
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Conclusion? It’s a hoax, an annoying chain mail. So why waste a minute of your busy day even reading this hoax email? You could’ve have a minute more to do other stuff, right?
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So please, don’t blindly forward emails; do search about it online (Uncle Google is best) and find out if it’s a hoax first before you forward them. It’s rather tiring to receive the same email over and over… for a span of ten years!

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~Estrelita Farr, tired of hoaxes. >_<

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Eh, lately I keep getting spam emails from random emails like admin@viagra.com or something (always from the same @viagra.com!!). Lucky for me, I don’t even read them so they don’t really affect me much. o_o
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But today, the topic is on WAR!!
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No, this isn’t Sparta. Not 300, either. But like the movie (and no, I haven’t watched the movie), this is a ridiculous war. And guess what? I’m victorious!!
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And so, let me retell my battle stories to all who’re willing to listen. xP
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(Though actually I meant to write this like 2 months ago, and I got lazy until today. o_o)

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Part 1: And the Symptoms Began…

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Avast Alert

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Well, here’s the story.
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  • I’m using Windows XP SP2. Not Vista, thank goodness.
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  • I’ve C: and D: drives (Program Files are in D: drive).
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  • I use Avast! antivirus, as you can see here.
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  • In the C: and D: directories, there are autorun files that triggers Avast’s alert (as in the picture) if I double click the drives to access from My Computer. Wonderful.
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  • No matter what you do to the file (move to chest, delete, etc), it keeps coming back.
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Persistent, right?
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IT’S TIME FOR WAR!!11!1!

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Part 2: HIDDEN FILES! SHOW YOURSELVES!!

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First thing, what I normally do is enable Show Hidden Files and Show System Files under Folder Options in order to catch the autorun files in my C: and D: drives, so that I could fry them before I fry the actual virus.
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And so, Browser > Tools > Folder Options > View.
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Check Show Hidden Files and uncheck Hide Protected Operating System Files. OK.
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Done.
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But hey, I still don’t see the semitransparent files in either C: or D: drives?!
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Round 2. Browser > Tools > Folder Options > View.
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What the?! Hide Hidden Files and Hide Protected Operating System Files became checked again!!
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Repeat, repeat, and repeat.
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Still the same story.
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Is there some hidden force messing about with my comp?! Darn it.
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Deciding to leave the virus for a while longer, I poked Uncle Google in search of a way to enable my Show Hidden Files and stuff again. Usually, a lot of sites aren’t very useful when it comes to these, but then I found a particular website (link here) that has lots of scripts to help with Windows stuff.
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And one of them is the Show Hidden Files script, which forces the Folder Options to change Show Hidden Files to be checked.
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Whee.
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It worked for a while… and then went back to its previous settings so I can’t find the hidden autorun files.
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Bleh.
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Another place, a forum topic, suggested using Regedit to force the Show Hidden Files to be checked, which is just to change the CheckedValue from 0 to 1.
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Close Regedit.
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Open Regedit.
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Lo and behold!!
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Still can’t see hidden files.

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Note: Oh, darn, the picture’s too long. Click on this link to view the whole picture.
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Eh, forget that for a while. Lemme kill the virus first.

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Part 3: UNCLE GOOGLE! HELP!!!

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Yep, as with all the malware problems I’ve had in the past (problems as in, I couldn’t remove it on my own), first I consult dear old Uncle Google. After all, I don’t really like registering on tech forums to bug people for help before I do all the things I could, first.
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Search results: 6510. Whoa.
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The first few are, as usual, some “HELP I GOT WIN32 ROOTKIT-GEN [RTK]!!!!1!!1!!” topics from various forums. Consulting these many topics, I began outlining and implementing my war strategy.
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Hey, they did help me… well, for other malware problems in the past. o_o
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Oh, and you know what?
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klif.sys is a file generated by Kaspersky antivirus… BUT I’VE NEVER HAD KASPERSKY IN MY ENTIRE LIFE!!
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It’s getting confusing. T_TT

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Part 4: VIRUSTOTAL! HELP!!!

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Virus Total is a website where you can upload a file and get it scanned (for free!) with some 30+ antivirus software and tell you the results. For example, if you find a funky looking file sitting happily in your system32 folder and your antivirus didn’t complain, you could get it scanned at this place without getting new software installed!
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Of course, it doesn’t help with removing the files, so… o_o
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This site was recommended in a few of the “HELP I GOT WIN32 ROOTKIT-GEN [RTK]!!!!1!!1!!” forum topics, and I found it’s a good place to start determining whether the file’s a false positive or really infected. And so, I uploaded the aforementioned file (and Avast! didn’t cease or desist and kept throwing me more of the “ZOMG ROOTKIT ALERT!!” message).
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Guess what? Virus Total said that 6 out of 32 antivirus programs say it’s a malware.
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Cool.
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Of course, once I found out it’s a malware, I tried removing it manually (i.e. by going to the folder and hitting delete). But Avast didn’t stop complaining, so…
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Skirmish lost.
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Part 5: SOPHOS ANTI-ROOTKIT! HELP!!!

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One of the help forum topics said to look for anti-rootkit tools to remove rootkits. Whee, something that sounds like it works.
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Consulting Uncle Google again (he never tires of me, does he?), I picked the first result from the list, which was Sophos Anti-Rootkit. Hey, the first on the list gotta be good, right?
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But this strategy failed, because Sophos Anti-Rootkit never did find any rootkit on the comp. And, upon searching the file using the Windows folder search, I couldn’t find the file again.
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What the heck?!
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Darn. Now I gotta find out exactly where it is again.
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Skirmishes lost: 2.

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Part 6: AVAST! HELP!!!

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Notice how I’ve only said the “ZOMG ROOTKIT ALERT!!” message pops up randomly? I never said anything about a scan, did I?
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Then, I began the time-consuming Avast scan while I poked Uncle Google a bit more.
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Hey, guess what?
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KLIF.SYS DIDN’T EVEN TURN UP ON THE AVAST SCAN!!11!1!!
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But I did find loads of other things, which included:
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  • Loads of Trojans on System Restore Files. Yikes! That gotta be the remains of the Trojan I fried from my sister’s friend’s pendrive some months ago, aren’t they?
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  • Loads of Rootkits on System Restore Files. Wut? Where’d that come from?!
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  • Some Rootkits on C: and D: folders. Were those the autorun files I tried to fry?
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It was a grand total of 16 infections!! That’s the most in years. o_o
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But since the scan didn’t catch the pesky little virus…
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Skirmishes lost: 3.
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Part 7: REBOOT, AVAST BOOT-TIME SCAN! HELP!!!

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When some of the guys on the forums asked for “I GOT WIN32 ROOTKIT-GEN [RTK]!!!!1!!1!!” help, I noticed that some of the files were (like some of my infections) System Restore files. The people who tried to help said to disable System restore, restart, and reenable System Restore.
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Yep, I disabled System Restore. And at the same time, I scheduled a boot-time Avast! scan.
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Then, I cleaned my temporary files. (1422 temp files ZOMG!)
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Muahaha, you gotta be fried now, virus!!
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And I hit restart.
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…3 hours later, the system rebooted, and, somehow, the rootkit is still there. Bleh.
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Skirmishes lost: 4.

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Part 8: TECH FORUMS! HELP!!!

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Yep, I do get desperate after 3 days. So I went on some forums and asked for help, telling them what I did so far.
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So I installed HijackThis (a program that scans your comp and saves a log file of running registries and process) and posted the log file to show the forum guys.
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Then take a look at the red line a guy helped me identify:
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O4 – HKLM..Run: [ZoneAlarm Client] “D:Program FilesZone LabsZoneAlarmzlclient.exe”
O4 – HKLM..Run: [avast!] D:PROGRA~1ALWILS~1Avast4ashDisp.exe
O4 – HKCU..Run: [MsnMsgr] “C:Program FilesWindows LiveMessengerMsnMsgr.Exe” /background
O4 – HKCU..Run: [kamsoft] C:WINDOWSsystem32ckvo.exe
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CKVO IS A MALWARE AS WELL!!!
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Holy macaroni. Is there no end to my woes in this war?
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Running numerous searches using Window’s folder search enabled me to locate ckvo.exe and ckv0.dll in the system32 folder. Upon deleting them manually (Avast doesn’t complain about them, somehow), the files disappear… and eventually come back.
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ZOMGWTFBBQ!!!11!!!!1!
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Skirmishes lost: 5.

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Part 9: MALWAREBYTES! HELP!!!

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Then there’s this other guy who came and offered help in the forums. He gave a list of 3 or 4 anti-rootkit software, but none of them found any rootkit.
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Weird?
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Then he suggested Super Anti-Spyware and MalwareBytes’ Anti-Malware, in hopes of finding whatever it was that causes the barrage of problems in my comp.
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Super Anti-Spyware found nothing but tracking cookies (normal stuff).
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MalwareBytes, on the other hand…
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IT SHOWED THE ROAD TO VICTORY IN THIS LONG WAR!!
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Registry Data Items Infected:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersion
ExplorerAdvancedFolderHiddenSHOWALLCheckedValue
(Hijack.System.Hidden) -> Bad: (0) Good: (1) -> Quarantined and deleted successfully.
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Oh yeah! It finally found the registry entry that blocked me from seeing hidden files!!
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Victory is near. xP
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Skirmishes won: 1.

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Part 10: And the Road to Victory!!

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Browser > Tools > Folder Options > View.
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Check Show Hidden Files and uncheck Hide Protected Operating System Files. OK.
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Repeat.
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Browser > Tools > Folder Options > View.
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LO AND BEHOLD!! SHOW HIDDEN FILES STAYED CHECKED AND HIDE SYSTEM FILES STAYED UNCHECKED!!
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Holy yeah. Clicking OK on Folder Options has never felt better.
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Since I’m finally able to see hidden and system files, I see loads and loads of familiar names in the C: and D: drives. THOSE ARE THE FILES THE ALERT KEEPS POPPING UP FOR BUT IN THE WRONG PLACE!!
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Darn. All this wild goose chase all because of a registry entry that doesn’t let me see hidden system files. T_T
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But hey, it’s finally over, right? After deleting all the autorun and stuff (and left the important system files alone), no more rootkit problems in my comp!!
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So, in conclusion?
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Use MalwareBytes’ Anti-Malware. It helps to kill infected registries. xP
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Note: After some time of deleting that one infected registry, I had some slight network problems on my computer and not my siblings’ computers. Upon reading some stuff from Google search, apparently messing with your registry messes up your Internet connection. However, there’s a solution; there’s one site (can’t remember which) that has something called a WinSock Fix script (just a script file). Upon using that, my network is fixed. So just a heads up. =D
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And all is well until now!

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~Estrelita Farr, enthusiastically writing!

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Oh, darn, I just realised that I haven’t been posting here for the past… what, four weeks? Five? And it’s June already!
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Unfortunately I was caught in the wave of events lately. It wasn’t as bad as it sounds, but being the blur-case I am, I just simply forgot about this for a while. o_o
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An update on Est-chan’s life: I finished my industrial training, so I was on holiday for a week, then I went back to university for my next semester, got promoted from a class representative to a course representative (more work T_T), being put in charge of organising an event here at the university, and had to figure out what to write for my final year project (FYP) thesis. Once I got my FYP title and went to ask the lecturer (to be my supervisor), I realised that there’s an army of students (a.k.a. my coursemates) looking for him as well. He’s too popular so I was worried!! Then I got him to sign the letter of undertaking, so I’m under him, but now I’m worried because he accepted 12 students, and he may not have time to supervise all of us… T_T
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Oh yeah, and I started playing Granado Espada, too. xP
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Anyways, I know I’m supposed to be writing about GE since I started playing it, but… I got too occupied/lazy to edit the screenshots properly. o_o
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So, here’s the topic for today!

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Updated Wallpaper of the Week:
The Cat God of the Brush

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Of Email Scams and Greedy People

What Email Scams are like and Some Ways to Recognise Them

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A Brief Introduction: Why Write on this Topic?

I’m not too sure on other countries, but here in Malaysia, you always see articles in the newspaper on how some people were scammed in many different ways (via fortune tellers, buying charms, etc). There are often articles like that, but how many articles have you seen are on online scams? None, as far as I’ve seen.
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So I wanted to bring it to light, because since the newspaper don’t highlight them, goodness knows how many people are getting scammed over this?
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That, and the fact that lately I’ve been getting these scam emails by the masses. I mean, yeah, I’ve been getting these emails occasionally in the past years, but to receive 84 of them (not including a small number with warning messages and those that were stuck in my junk folder) in the past 4 weeks is a bit much, isn’t it? And the number of email scams I receive each day is increasing!
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And so, I’ve been collecting them for this post. xP

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What are Email Scams?

Email scams are those kinds of emails sent to you for the purpose of scamming you (or just spamming your inbox). Read through and click on the example links for pictures of how email scams look like!

(Because I’m too lazy to really explain what an email scam is. xP)

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How do We Find Out They’re Scam?

There are several ways, though they’re not exactly foolproof (especially when you’re blind to everything but the desire to get that amount of money). We’ll look at each one of them carefully!

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  • Subject headings that are all caps.
    I had 34 of these out of 84 scam emails I saved (or 40.5%). Like, literally “TRANSFER OF US$14,000,000” or “CONTACT ME”. What I found is that official emails are hardly (if not) found in all capital letters. Note that I said official emails and not personal emails, so this isn’t exactly foolproof. But hey, if you see an email from MASTERCARD and the subjects are in all caps, then you know it’s most likely a fraud without even opening the message!

Example of an all caps subject.

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  • Email sender names that are all caps.
    I had 32 of these out of 84 scam emails I saved (or 38.1%). Yep, even those that says “HSBC BANK LONDON” (I got one of those before). Official companies don’t usually use all caps in their company names, so when you see an all caps name, then you know it’s a fraud. And that’s even before opening the message!

Example of an all caps email sender name.

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  • Weird/suspicious subject headings.
    This one depends on your own discretion. Some of those email subject headings may strike to you as suspicious or weird, and it’s not easy telling people what is suspicious or weird. One thing you can be sure of is official company email subjects should not have excessive exclamation marks (!!!!!!), unless it’s a reply (Re:) of your email and you used a lot of them.

Examples of weird/suspicious subject headings:

Scam victim compensation? Is there even such a thing?
Doesn’t the word “whooping” strike you as odd?
Might have trusted this (not!) if it weren’t for the second part of the subject!

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  • Weird/suspicious sender names.
    Also depends on your own discretion, but in my opinion, it’s a little easier than the previous. Look for misspellings in the company name, numbers (yes, numbers, like “Mr. Alex Hammingwey 05”), titles like Mr. and Dr. (I’m always suspicious of those in emails), funny symbols (question mark, full stop, etc), and warnings such as “OUTSTANDING DEBT PAYMENT” and “GRANT AWARD” (it’s fine in the subject, but sender name?). Oh, not to mention really funny looking ones like the lottery example below.

Examples of weird/suspicious subject headings:

Where’s your company name?
Misspelling, ahoy?
Full stops are used. And don’t you find the subject suspicious?
Yahoo and Msn aren’t by same companies… and they have a lottery board?!

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  • Email requesting personal information like full name, address, etc.
    Now that we’re done filtering by the email sender name and subject heading, now we’ll look at the actual email content. First, you can ignore most of the email. The important part is if they ask for personal information such as your full name, phone number, home address, bank account number, etc. If they do, it’s instantly a scam, because if actual companies were to email you, wouldn’t they already have your personal info if they have your email in the first place?

Example of a short email scam asking for personal info.

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  • “Please reply to (insert free email address, i.e. Yahoo, Hotmail).”
    Seriously, are you going to trust a company that uses free email addresses such as Yahoo and Hotmail that anyone can easily create an account in?

Examples of reply-to-free-address email scam:

Reply to Yahoo mail example, with red safety bar (Hotmail).
Reply to Live mail, with yellow safety bar (Hotmail).

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  • And other ways I can’t think of now. Figure those out yourselves. xP

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How to Avoid Getting Email Scams?

All I can say is, don’t simply give your email everywhere. Don’t put your email in public view on your website/blog/guide/etc, don’t sign up at fishy looking websites, and stuff like that.
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There are actually bots that search for emails to spam them like heck. Even if you think “Ah, it’s only my email!”, coming from a person who gets over 5 scam emails a day, I’ll tell you it’s really annoying. O_o
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And yes… that’s exactly  how my old email got spammed like crazy. It’s because I put an email in plain view in a website I used to have, and I can’t remove it because I lost access to it. It’s sad. T_T

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What to Do After Receiving an Email Scam?

Ignore it, of course!
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Because if you reply, whether with true personal info or to give them a piece of your mind, they’d be happy to spam you more with those, since by replying, you’re telling them this is your active account. (At least, this is what my boyfriend said. o_o)
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It’s your choice to set these emails as junk mail or put the emails on your block sender list, though I haven’t tried either so I can’t tell you whether it works or not. O_o
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Those with experience, please state your views!

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Hopefully you guys are happy enough with this post, it’s pretty long. xP
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And hopefully I wouldn’t get too lazy to post about GE next time! =D

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~Estrelita Farr, signing out!

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Of course, we’d always meet all kinds of weird people in our life. There could be a lady who lives down the road who keeps dozens of snakes as pets (which is regarded as strange by most people), or there could be that guy who lives next door who throws insults at you every time he sees you.
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Though, while we may meet inconsiderate (and rude!) people in real life, you’d see even more of those on the internet!
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For example, take Gunz: the Duel, a online third-person-shooter game that I often play. Most people in that game are… to put it bluntly, idiots. Many come into the game room and yell these statements in a very much coarser English (i.e. broken English).
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  • Just entering the game room (before dueling others): “I’M A PRO! ALL OF YOU ARE INSECTS THAT DON’T DESERVE TO BE MENTIONED! I WILL DEFEAT YOU WITH MY UTTER PRO-NESS!!”
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  • During dueling: “ZOMG *******!!”
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  • After dueling (win): “AHAHAHAHA TAKE THAT YOU ******!! LOOK WHO’S PRO NOW!!!!!”
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  • After dueling (lose): “ZOMG YOU ****! LAGGING ******* AND ******* AND *******!! EVERYONE ******* KICK HIM!!!”
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  • For the remaining duration of the game: “YOU ******* *******!!” x817238178321 times.
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Yep, you get those people in a game, and it’s not exactly an uncommon event. T_T
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Thankfully, most of these people are manageable. It’s possible to remain unscathed from a barrage of abuses (with practice) and enjoy the game like you’re supposed to. After all, games are supposed to be there for you to enjoy and pass the time, right? =D
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Some ways to deal with uncouth online people:
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  • Ignore.
    Yep, one of the most basic steps. I’m sure some games allow you to “hide” chats so you don’t have to read what other people say (Gunz has it too). Though sometimes chatting with other people online (with friends or friendly strangers) is what makes online games better than offline ones, so this may not work so well. However, we can also just dismiss what other people say and only response to the friendly ones, right?
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  • Act indifferent.
    Some people bash you with insults for the fun of it, some do it to feel like they have power and in control. One way to react towards flames/insults is to act like you’re not affected negatively by the statement. You’d be surprised how the flames stop after a while, though it’ll infuriate the flamer because you’re not affected (no stress-relief for them!) Though, of course, sometimes you’d get those stubborn ones… O_o
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  • Don’t worry, be happy!
    Of course, this doesn’t include self-bashing!
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  • And more!
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  • Combinations of above!
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While these steps can be effective, they’re not exactly foolproof. These are just ways to cope with flames, to make your gaming time more enjoyable!
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And since we’re here, let me put in a few examples of what I do when insulted:
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(After a duel where the other guy lost)

Other guy: ZOMG YOU LAGGER NOOB!!!!!
Me: Lag is mutual. <—- indifference
Other guy: NO WAY YOU NOOB!! YOU LAG!!!!
Me: *ignores* <—- ignorance
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As you can see above, I just say one statement and let it go. Usually (and I mean usually), after you ignore a few insults from him/her, s/he’d give up.
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Of course, you sometimes get those times when a group of them start insulting you, and you can apply what I did above and hope for the best. When they successfully kick you out of the room, however, you can always go to another room to find friendlier people!
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Lastly, what I suggested may not be the best way to do it, but it’s a good way to start. And the most important thing is, enjoy yourself when you play games! =D

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~Estrelita Farr, signing out!

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